Exhibit showcases nature in photos

World seen through vast landscapes

Running through April 3, “Salt/Water” utilizes photos of nature  to initiate a sophisticated conversation about humanity. Mark Hail | The Falcon

Running through April 3, “Salt/Water” utilizes photos of nature to initiate a sophisticated conversation about humanity.
Mark Hail | The Falcon

Seventy-one percent of our earth is covered in water.

In a bustling and ever expanding world, it can sometimes be mind boggling to comprehend that water on this Earth is much more massive than ever made imaginable.

The Photographic Center Northwest, which featured the thoughtful show entitled “Me and My Selfie” last fall, sheds light on landscape art with a distinctive perspective in their new exhibit “Salt/Water.”

The images in the “Salt/Water” gallery initiate a sophisticated conversation that dictates ties to humanity; expressing both the persistence and delicacy of landscape photography. Together, artists have collaborated to garner deeper meaning while cultivating unique images

The walls of the gallery hold multiple forms of photography. Proving that they are versatile as they are unique, PCNW continues to impress. “Salt/Water” is shown in the gallery through April 3.

The exhibit focuses on observing specific components of water, as well as naturally occurring minerals. From salted prints to raging seas, the show accentuates contemporary landscape in a captivating sequence.

Public Program Curator Chieko Phillips worked closely with the Programs Chair and Executive Director on big-picture strategies related to the history and future of “Salt/Water.”

“This exhibit highlights landscape photography with a little bit of a twist. The images don’t look like your typical landscape,” Phillips said.

Some of these pieces were submerged in water, offering more of an abstract image.

An image created a photographer based in Washington, titled “Literal Drift,” features Ward Beach of Bainbridge Island.

“It’s my favorite because I like the proportions of it,” administrative associate of PCNW Katie Hudak said. “You’re actually looking at the wave from an aerial view and I love that there are actual pieces of nature on it.”

Walking through the exhibit viewers are immersed in a whirlwind of calming images and intricately simple, yet fascinating design.

The gallery features artists from the local scene all the way up to international photographers.

Appreciative of the fact that such a broad range of artists are acknowledged, the information beneath the photos allow the patron to fully understand a piece and from where it’s derived.

The photos encased along the walls offer reflection and perspective. The connection to the piece translates over into the mind of the viewer and thus, to the outside world.

Hudak welcomes the exhibit as it takes a seemingly basic landscape and utilizes light, color and texture to instill meaning and depth. “As someone who is not normally inclined towards landscape photography, that says a lot,” Hudak said.

The exhibit showcased pacific northwest scenery and various levels of art mediums. Mark Hail | The Falcon

The exhibit showcased pacific northwest scenery and various levels of art mediums.
Mark Hail | The Falcon

Artists Kimberly Anderson makes salted paper prints using salt crystals from photographed locations of Utah’s Great Salt Lake. Her current work focuses on bridging the gap between land and story.

Each piece contains an artifact from where the photograph was taken.

Susan Derges is an acclaimed British artist whose work expands on water’s movement using a camera-less developing process.

This is a method of photography in which images are created on photographic paper via casting shadows, manipulating light or by chemically treating the surface of paper.

“We try to push photography as a business,” Phillips said. “We try to elevate photographers who are not usually represented in galleries.”

Seattle-based photographer, Daniel Hawkins also utilizes a unique approach. When developing his images, he remains on site. By doing this, the subject of the photograph becomes part of the photographic process.

Upon moving to Seattle, Riepenhoff has taken advantage of the rain and has incorporated it to fit her craft. She takes produces images that represent the action of waves, wind and time.

The “Salt/Water” exhibit is truly a gem that should not be missed.

“We are open to everybody, we are an educational institution,” Phillips said. “We are a needed facility.”

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